Dev Party – Spilling the Tea with Cyanotypes

On this episode of Dev Party, we’re doing something a bit different. We’re not developing film, but making a few cyanotypes, bleaching them and then tanning them in tea and/or coffee!

Eric made three cyanotypes using Photographer’s Formulary Cyanotype Kit and a UV lamp. The lamp is made by Everbeam. It’s the 365nm 50w LED black light. The exposure times varied from 4 or 8 mins.

For bleaching, he used 1liter of water with 2tsps of sodium carbonate in it. This bleaches off the blue in under a minute.

And finally, for staining, he used 10 teabags of black tea brewed for around 10mins in 1.5l of water.

Here are the results:

Vania exposed her cyanotype with the sun. She did not bleach, but stained in strong green tea.

Here are her results:

PATREON

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THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Through Songs and Magpies: Listening to Images (w/ Jordan Tiberio)

And we’re back! It’s been a wonderful little break, but it’s even better to be back in the studio and chitty some chat.

On this episode, we’ll be talking to photographer and collector Jordan Tiberio (@jordantiberio on IG)! We’ll also consider how sound interacts with our work and we’ll talk about a couple of songs that have a little to do with photography. There’s also zine reviews and some random catching up.

Jordan Tiberio

Jordan Tiberio grew up in Rochester, and began seriously shooting photography at 15. Through her work, she strives to find the odd in the ordinary. Her work, which is mostly in color, walks a thin line between timeless reality and beautiful fantasy. She’s done commercial work for the New Yorker, Vox, Teen Vogue, and Refinery 29. 

Jordan is also a collector of vintage and antique photos – and we’ll talk to her a bit about that, too. 

Web: www.jordantiberio.com

IG: @jordantiberio

IG: @anothersmemory

Here are some of her film photos:

And here are some of her vintage collection:

Listening to Images

Photography is a visual medium. We look through the viewfinder to take the picture. We view the negatives while scanning or printing, and in the end, we see the final product – the photograph. While our other senses are there, they’re not exactly working overtime.

We can feel the weight of the camera, the film while loading in the dark bag, the print in our hands. We can smell the developing chemicals (careful!). We can taste the nasty lickum strip on old 120 rolls. But what role does hearing play in our photography? 

Here are the two photos of ours that we discussed:

And the two by other photographers that we talked about:

Zine Reviews!

We reviewed three this time around:

The Lost Show by Ben Fey: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1104292718/the-lost-show-photography-zine

Views of Tucscon, Issue Five: https://www.kikiewilkins.com/

Film and the Girl by Jennifer Stamps: https://filmandthegirl.com/shop/yhtdlvkqwpom9wpy8m5b7ijqv7f1tf

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – A Crash Course in Remjet Surgery

On this impromptu episode of Dev Party, we’re going commercial! Okay, not really, but we *are* using Eric’s ECN-2 kit to develop Kodak Motion Picture film in 120! Now, this isn’t Cinestill – this is the raw stuff, complete with Remjet coating!

Remjet is a thin carbon coating on the non-emulsion side of motion picture film. It serves as a sort of dry lubrication (as the film speeds through the movie cameras) and provides some sort of anti-halation services (this is disputed, but whatever).

We first tell you how to mix the kit, which is super simple. And then we tell you two ways to remove Remjet: Baking Soda water and elbow grease.

Eric’s kits are available here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/781436189/ecn-2-color-film-developing-kit

Vania shot Kodak Vision 3 500T in a Mamiya RB67, and here are her beautiful results:

Meanwhile, Eric developed two rolls shot in Vania’s Hasselblad 500C. He wasn’t trilled with the results, but hasn’t used the camera enough to feel any sort of comfort with it. Here are a few he liked:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – X-Ray in the Tickle Tent (Again-ish)

On this weird little episode of Dev Party, Eric re-enters the Tickle Tent – his portable darkroom tent – to tray develop some Fuji HR-U X-ray film. Badly. He does it very badly. Meanwhile, Vania develops two sheets of color and somehow winds up with four sheets. What is this trickery?

Find out!

Here is what Vania came up with…

And here is what Eric’s done with Fuji HR-U at 100iso devved in Rodinal 1+100 for 4ish minutes:

And here are some shots of the tent:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – Technically Technical Almost Panchromatic

On the first Dev Party of 2022, Eric dips a little bit into Kodak Technical Pan, aka, Techpan! Meanwhile, Vania develops some Ilford FP4+ she shot through her Voightlander Väg.

Eric developed Techpan (for some reason) in PMK; 5+10+450 for 12mins. Since the film had expired in October of 1992, he shot it at 6iso. The entire roll was very overexposed, and he probably could have gotten away with shooting it at box speed (25 or 32iso). Nevertheless, here are a few of his photos:

Vania devved the FP4+ in PMK as well – 1+2+100 for 10mins. Here are some of her’s:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – Pulling Not Pushing

On this – our last episode of the year – Vania tells us all about the Surfbort show she shot. Eric talks a little about ending a long ass trip with one final roll of film.

Vania managed to shoot Fuji Neopan 1600 at 400iso in her Minolta Hi-Matic – and so she had to pull it two stops. Wild, huh?

Meanwhile, Eric shot some expired Plus-X in the Mamiya RB67.

Here are Vania’s pics:

And here are Eric’s:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Disposable Cameras and Their Permanence (w/ Jenny Sampson)

On this episode, we’re talking to Jenny Sampson (@jennysampsonphotography on IG), tintypist and author of Skater Girls. We’ll also be taking a good long look at disposable cameras – from the very first in 1886 to the very last … to be released by Kodak in the near future – Apparently, the future is disposable too. We’ll also share some news from Shanghai and ORWO, as well as talk a bit about what we’re up to. Then there’s the answering machine and a couple of zine reviews. Let’s go!

Jenny Sampson

We both recently discovered Jenny Sampson through stumbling upon her book Skater Girls – filled with tintype portraits of skater girls. Then we realized we briefly met at Polacon in San Francisco right before the pandemic hit.

Jenny is a third generation Californian, has been shooting film from an early age, and has spent the last decade or so making tintypes of skaters. She’s also the board president of the East Bay Photo Collective, and is a member of the Rolls and Tubes collective.

IG: @jennysampsonphotography

Web: https://www.jennysampson.com/

Here are a few of her tintypes:

Disposable Cameras: History and Future

From the very beginning of photography, shooting and developing pictures yourself was a huge pain in the ass. The cameras were complicated, unwieldy and expensive. The film wasn’t film, it was glass or tin. And developing was dangerous, highly flammable, toxic and required a cadre of chemicals with names like pyrogallic acid, sulphate of uranium, and chloroplatinate of mercury.

But then in 1888, the Eastman Dry Plate and Film Company from Rochester New York released a camera called The Kodak – a wooden, leather-covered box with a single shutter speed, and a single aperture. Inside was a roll of film – invented a few years earlier by Eastman – long enough to take 100 pictures. There was no focusing, no metering, hell, since the photos were round, there wasn’t even a need to level.

Here are some ads and whatnot from various historical disposable cameras:

Zine Reviews

Portrait of a City by Ben Yount

Bulldozed Future #3 by  Ryan Berkebile

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

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THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – Encouraging Casual Conversation (while Developing)

In this episode, we are just kicking back, developing some film and having a lovely little chat. The conversation meanders from film to developers, from that one town in Idaho or maybe Montana to whatever.

Vania developed a mystery roll of Vericolor II (expired in the early 80s), and speculates as to what’s on it. She devved it in C-41, though she obviously wishes she had one of Eric’s ECN-2 kits.

Meanwhile, Eric developed a glorious roll of the greatest emulsion ever – Ultrafine Extreme 400. And he did it in Pyro PMK (1+2+100; 13mins).

Here are some of Vania’s pics:

And here are some of Eric’s:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Murder vs. Death: Books of Crime Scene Photos (w/ Jon Hilty)

We talk to Jon Hilty (@amphetadreamer on IG) because we were wrong about Autochromes! There’s also some history about the View-Master, and we take a good look at two books of early crime scene photos. There’s also Tiffen (@tiffen.sinclair on IG), zine reviews and some other fun along the way.

Jon Hilty: DIY Autochromes

In our last episode, we talked about autochrome color photos, basically saying that it couldn’t be done.

And with that, we got a bunch of folks messaging us, saying that we should talk to Jonathan Tod Hilty who had done it.

IG: @amphetadreamer

https://www.jonhilty.com/

A guide to making autochromes:
https://www.jonhilty.com/autochromeguide

It’s a bit older, but here are some more pictures of the autochromes he’s made:
https://www.jonhilty.com/autochromegallery

Here are some examples of the Lippmann plates:
https://www.jonhilty.com/lippmanngallery

Here are a few of his latest:

Short History of the View-Master

The View-Master was introduced in April of 1939 at the New York Worlds Fair. This was also where RCA introduced television, Dupont introduced Nylon, and Einstein gave a speech about cosmic rays.

What fairgoers witnessed was a futuristic improvement upon the stereocards of old. Using a stereoscope (which every antique store is legally required to sell), the grandparents of these spectators could look at 3D renderings of individual photographs, taken with special stereo cameras. Stereo photos pre-dated the Civil War, and so by 1939, they were old hat.

What View-Master provided was an exciting update.  Round cardboard circles (which they called “reels”), held 14 16mm Kodachrome transparencies, which made seven pairs of photos – one for each eye. When looked at through a View-Master, they would be rendered in 3D. And with the flick of the lever, the reel would advance to the next 3D photo. 

Here’s a bunch of ads:

Murder vs. Death: Early 1900s Crime Scene Photos

Back in April, we did an episode called Mugshots and Memorials (episode 41 if you were wondering). In the main feature, we talked about Alphonse Bertillon, the French police photographer responsible for the creation of mugshots. Bertillon, an exacting fellow, noted all sorts of things about the human face. He believed that things like ear size or arm length might determine someone’s criminal potentiality.

But oddly enough, we’re not here to talk about Bertillon and his crime scene photographs. Not directly, anyway.

A while back, we picked up two books on crime scene photos in hopes of making some larger piece with them. 

The first, Murder in the City, a collection of glass plates from New York City in the 1910s and 20s, is very much in the vein of Bertillon – it’s almost classy.

The other, called Death Scenes, is a book of crime scene photos from 1940s LA. It’s very candid, very matter-of-fact. Though the subjects are dead bodies, the way they are photographed is nearly the opposite of Bertillon – at least as far as unintentional artfulness went.

It might seem a little obvious that photos of murder victims would be potentially unnerving and upsetting. But we weren’t really prepared to deal with the photos in one of these two books.

We’re not sharing many photos from either book, but here are some photos about the God’s Eye View Tripod setup:

But here are some of Eugene de Salignac’s photos:

Zine Reviews

Future Condos by Jesse Rinyu – @jrinyu on IG

Toy Golf by Garon Kiesel (@grain_or_die on IG)

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

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THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 92

Dev Party – The Great Exchange

On this episode, we talk about our experiences shooting each others cameras (while developing the film we’re talking about).

Vania shot Eric’s Mamiya m645j, while Eric shot Vania’s Hasselblad 500C.

Answering the previous episode’s Answering Machine Question, we both talk about the various animal encounters we’ve had (some together!).

Eric developed Foma Retropan 320 in Foma Retro Special, and here are a few of his:

Vania shot Kodak Lumiere. And here are some of her’s:

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists