Ghosts, Orbs, and Exploding Nitrate Film (with Dave Wilson of Victorian Photography Studio)

On this spooky episode, we’ll be talking to Dave from Victorian Photo Studio in Gettysburg (@vps_gettysburg on IG) about tintypes and ghost photos! We’ll also tell you all about some ridiculously explosive film that was essentially gunpowder.  Ever wanted to know how to spot a fake ghost photo? It’s pretty easy, but we’ll tell you how anyway! There’s also Tiffen Sinclair (@tiffen.sinclair on IG), zine reviews and oodles more.

Dave Wilson!

Dave is a tintypist and historian who brings your Victorian dreams to life (or death) using traditional old timey photography. He’s also been trying to replicate William Mumler’s techniques of producing “spectral images.”

Our talk with him was wonderful and entertaining. Here are a few of his tintypes:

During the interview, Dave mentioned a couple of Civil War photos:

Tidball’s Battery
Regiment resting at Fredericksburg, Va

Nitrate Film

Have you ever seen the words “Safety Film” marked on the edge of your rolls or sheets? Just what does it mean? If this film is “safe,” is there “unsafe” film? 

Nitrate film (or as they called it then, film) wasn’t dynomite. Yes, it was hazardous, it was explosive, but a lot of things were back then. I mean, they had kerosene lamps in the house – just burning away above your heads. That said, nitrate film, especially when it came to motion picture film, wasn’t without its victims.

At room temperature, nitrate film is almost perfectly safe-ish. But get too much above (say, 200 F) and you’re inching towards a very low flash point. Remember, this is essentially gun powder, except more explosive and more flammable.

For fire to burn, it needs oxygen and fuel. Take either away and out goes fire. A candle can be snuffed out by a bell, which deprives it of oxygen, or by cutting off the wick, which removes the fuel. Nitrate film is fascinating because it contains its own oxygen and is its own fuel.

Simply put, it can never be extinguished – it has to burn itself out. Even submerging it in water won’t do the trick. You can’t smother it with dirt or even in a fire blanket. And if you try to, it’ll release clouds of poison gases.

Here are some scenes from the 1929 Cleveland Clinic Fire, which we discussed in the episode:

Zine Reviews

Elsie’s Camera is a ¼ size zine out out by M Forrester – @itsbittertooth on IG. After purchasing a huge lot of old photographs, they found a few featuring a woman named Elsie. Unable to find out anything more about this Elsie, they put together a zine. 

In these 28 pages, they feature 13 photos of Elsie probably taken around 1920. They also included the backs, where brief little nuggets of information were found. Things like “Here is Elsie with her hair bobbed, taken in the front garden.” and “Dick bought this coat Elsie has on”

It’s less than $3.00, and you can get it on Etsy. The link will be in the show notes:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/649347071/elsies-camera-found-photography-zine

Blu. is a small female empowered surf zine made by women for women. Our first edition is dedicated to the unseen and the unsung, featuring female works who we find to be inspiring and empowering without the need for any negative space. For a long time, men have been at the forefront of the surfing industry, that’s why with Blu., we’ve created a community built up for women by women, without the need for any expectations. If a woman can surf, then she’s a surfer, regardless of what society may say.

Zine size: 16cm x 24cm, paperback, 42 pages.

10% of profits will be donated to www.seasisterslk.com

https://www.alinearnold.com/shop/blu

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – The Loneliest Pine

On this episode of Dev Party, we talk about our day in Lone Pine, California, the Museum of Western Film. We also talk about Museum of Western Film History, which we visited. There were some amazing clouds, some perfect skies, and some photos we’re super stoked about.

We also talked about the non-photographic mediums that have influenced our photography. How how safe it is to photograph lightening. There’s a whole lot here, really.

Vania developed Arista Edu Ultra 100 (aka, Fomapan 100) in FA-1027 (much more on this developer next Dev Party). Here they are:

Meanwhile, Eric developed a roll of Ilford Pan F+ that he shot at Lone Pine. He devved in Pyro PMK. Here are four:

Vania devved her Lone Pine shots a few weeks ago, and … well … check them out:

Concerning the non-photographic mediums, Eric talked about Andrew Wyeth, but also Albert Bierstadt. Here’s the Bierstadt he talked about:

Vania talked about John Everett Millais’ “Ophelia” … and as Polonius said, “I shall be brief.”:

END CREDITS

www.allthroughalens.com

Vania: IGFlickrZines, Website
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits

French Surrealism and Chill (with Kalie Frisky)

On this episode we will be chatting it up with Kalie Frisky, we’ll explore collaborations through  the somewhat recently re-discovered work by Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore – two French Surrealists in love! Also Tiffin’s fit with film will drop a new hit, there’s the answering machine, and we’ll have a little bit of fun with inspirational quotes.

Kalie Frisky

Kalie Frisky is a color film photographer from New York. On this episode, we’re focusing a bit on collaboration, and since Kalie does just that, we thought we’d have a little talk with her.

@kaliefrisky on IG

Web: www.kaliefrisky.com

Here’s a few of her shots:

Claude Cahun & Marcel Moore

Claude Cahun was born October 25, 1894 as Lucy Schwob. Though raised in a wealthy and artistic family, her childhood was plagued by misfortune and abuse. Her mother was institutionalized with a mental illness, her father wished, for her own suffering’s sake, that she had  never been born. She was sadistically bullied in school, and was prejudiced against because she was Jewish. 

It was in this state, at the age of 15, that she met Marcel Moore, born two years before Claude, as Suzanne Malherbe. There was immediate attraction, and then love, and they would spend the rest of their lives together. 

But first, they split for schooling – Lucy attained a literature and philosophy degree, while Suzanne attended a school of drawing and design. This education would form the foundation for all their artistic pursuits – apart, and in collaboration.

And this collaboration is why we’re talking about Claude Cahun and Marcel Moore. 

In this piece, we reference a bunch of their photos. Here they are:

And here are some of Marcel’s photomontages and illustrations:

Books we suggest:

Don’t Kiss Me: The Art of Claude Cahun & Marcel Moore edited by Louise Downie

Exist Otherwise: The Life and Works of Claude Cahun by Jennifer L. Shaw

Zine Reviews!

We reviewed two zines! Eric took on My Only Homeland; An Unfoldable Zine by Jessica Fuentes. You can (and should) get it here.

Vania covered NSEW zine. Not only does it feature Vania, it’s got Jason Biehner, Kaleb Starr, and Sonja Langford.

You can get it here.

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – Don’t Be Ascared of the Dark

Full notes and photos here: www.allthroughalens.com

In this darkened episode of Dev Party, Eric and Vania develop Ilford Delta 3200, which they both shot under natural and incidental light in very dark places.

Vania captured surfboard shaper, Mike, plying his craft. And here are some of her shots:

Meanwhile, Eric developed two roles. The first was shot in Havre, Montana, and the other was in the courthouse in Paducah, Texas:

They both devved in HC-110B for 14 minutes.

END CREDITS

www.allthroughalens.com

Vania: IGFlickrZines, Website
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits

The Flight of the Pigeon Photographers (with Izzie Farr)

This episode is a mixed bag of goodness. We’ll be talking to Izzie Farr (@izzie_farr on IG), who authored an open letter to Kodak that recently got a bit of attention. Autumn is basically upon us, so we’ll talk a little bit about school pictures (while dredging up some questionable memories). And also pigeon photographers: what are they, and why? We’ve got zine reviews, the answering machine, and of course Tiffen Sinclair’s (@tiffen.sinclair on IG) Fit with Film. 

Izzie Farr

Our guest this week is Izzie Farr, a film photographer from London. A few weeks back Kodak’s main Instagram page (@kodak on IG), which has over 850,000 followers, received quite a lot of criticism for featuring more than thirty male photographers in a row – even after repeatedly being called out about it in their comments section.

Izzie wrote an open letter to Kodak, and it went viral.

We discuss her work and her letter, plus the reaction she received from the film community as well as from Kodak.

Here are a few samples of her work:

Pigeon Photographers

The city-dwelling pigeon, though nearly identical to its more rural and sophisticated cousin, the dove, has received unfair slander from its most nearest neighbors  – the ungrateful humans. Through our character assassination of this almost noblest of birds, we have forgotten its long and storied history of unintentional service to our own unworthy species.

In 1907, German apothecary, Dr. Julius Neubronner decided to attach a camera to a pigeon to get some shots from the air.

“This camera was fitted to the breast of the pigeon by means of elastic braces passed across the back underneath the wings. Eight consecutive snapshots were made at regular intervals by the automatic exposing device.”

Here are a few photos of the cameras he made:

And here are some shots taken by the pigeons:

School Pictures

In a short segment, we talked a bit about Lifetouch and school photos. Here are the very few photos we could find of the Micro Z camera:

Zine Reviews

This episode, Vania reviewed Portraits in Paradise by David Wiewel (davidwiewel on IG).

Eric reviewed Better off, Issue Three (@betteroffzine on IG). It was photographed by Chandler Flanagan (@dispositionpictures on IG) and edited by Travis Cannaday (@travis_cannaday on IG).

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – This Must Be the Place (Maybe?)

On this episode of Dev Party we talk about our week and develop a couple of rolls of something or other.

Vania developed some expired Vericolor III in C-41. Here are some of her shots:

Meanwhile, Eric developed Fomapan 400 in Pyro PMK. Here are his shots:

We also answer the question: is there a place where you took nothing but good pictures anywhere you looked? Curiously, we were both together when both of our answers happened. Amazing!

END CREDITS

www.allthroughalens.com

Vania: IGFlickrZines, Website
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits

The Archiving of Lora Webb Nichols

This episode is basically all Lora Webb Nichols. We’ll tell you a bit about her life, a little about her photos, and we’ll talk to Nancy Anderson, the woman responsible for saving her collection. And speaking of saving collections, we’re covering how places like the Smithsonian preserve their photography archives, and how we can all do a little better in our own archiving. Not only that, but Tiffen Sinclair will be dropping by once again! Oh, and we’ve got zine reviews.

Lora Webb Nichols

Lora Webb Nichols received her first camera – a Kodak box – from Bert, her future husband, a month after her 16th birthday.The next day, she took a photo of her mother in the doorway. In turn, her mother took one of Lora, and then one of Lora and Yankee, the cat. “My camera is the best fun” Lora concluded at the end of the roll.

 From this moment, until her death in 1962, Lora photographed everything, amassing nearly 18,000 photos. 

We will be sharing more of her photos on social media, but here is a nice collection:

You can read more about her, and see more of her photos here: http://www.lorawebbnichols.org/

Basically every single photo she took and collected are available to view at the American Heritage Center archive here.

Grand Encampment Museum: https://gemuseum.com/

Nancy Anderson

Nancy Anderson lived with Lora Webb Nichols in the early 60s, and now lives in the Lora’s old house. It is her we have to thank for preserving the unbelievably huge archive of Lora’s 24,000 negatives, including over 18,000 of her own. 

Nancy specifically mentioned a few photos during the interview. Here are the ones that we could track down:

Archive Everything!

The Lora Webb Nichols Archive was nearly lost due to a number of factors, but mostly improper preservation methods. So much more has been learned about the proper care and handling of photographic prints, negatives and plates since Lora began shooting in 1899. Even since her death in 1962, we have come up with what seems to be the gold standard of preservation.

So let’s take a look at how places like the Smithsonian Institute, the Library of Congress and the National Archives are doing this. Obviously we can’t maintain their exacting standards, but it’s good to at least know what’s being done to preserve our photographic history.

Here are some links:

https://siarchives.si.edu/what-we-do/preservation/environment

https://siarchives.si.edu/what-we-do/preservation/storage-handling

https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/preservation-leaflets/5.-photographs/5.3-care-of-photographs

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/photolea.html

https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/photo.html

https://www.archives.gov/preservation/storage/negatives-transparencies.html

https://www.preservationequipment.com/Blog/Blog-Posts/Blog-Categories/Archival-Storage

Zine Reviews!

On this episode, Eric reviewed Half-Frame Journal by Shawn Granton

You can follow Shawn @urbanadventureleaguepdx on Instagram. 

Pick up his zine here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1055795334/half-frame-journal-1-photo-zine

Created with GIMP

You can also pick up Eric’s new zine here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/1076682381/in-this-land-vol-1-no-4-seattle-winter

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

Dev Party – Summer Rockets

One this, our first Dev Party of the season, we answer part of the question: what did we do on our summer vacation. In this case, we fired off model rockets with cameras attached to them.

Specifically, we shot a pair of Estes Astrocam 110s in the Alvord Desert, Oregon. With each launch (when we remembered to set the shutter), the rocket-camera took a photo. It was almost always a bad photo, but a photo nonetheless.

Both Eric and Vania had their own rockets. They shot a few pics with the rocket-camera, attempting to use it as a regular camera. Those, oddly enough, worked better. They both loaded the same rolls into a Kraft Velveeta 110 promotional camera and shot with that for a week or so.

Here are some shots from Eric’s roll (some were shot by Vania):

And here are some shots from Vania’s roll (some were shot by Eric):

Meanwhile, Vania developed a color roll she shot in the Graflex 2×3 (with a square back for some reason):

END CREDITS

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Vania: IGFlickrZines, Website
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits

Rocket Summer (with Tiffen Sinclair)

Welcome to Season Three! On our first episode back, we tell you how we spent our summer vacations. Tiffen @tiffen.sinclair on IG) will drop by for a chat about her summer. And we’ll give you a quick history of rocket-cameras. Also, the answering machine and zine reviews!

Tiffen Sinclair

When we last checked in with Tiffen, she had some pretty amazing summer plans. But life sometimes throws wrenches. Find out what happened!

Here are a few of her more recent photos:

Rocket-Cameras

We set aside some time to tell you a quick history of humans attaching film cameras to rockets. From the late 1800s until this past summer, humans seem to love nothing more than to strap cameras to things that shoot into the sky.

We got around to telling you about Estes model rockets. Here’s a little gallery of their ads for their rocket-cameras:

Here are some links that we might have promised:

https://www.dembrudders.com/history-and-use-of-the-estes-astrocam-110.html

http://www.rcgrabbag.com/estes-camroc-1966

http://www.ninfinger.org/rockets/rockets.html

Zine Reviews

Monochrome Mania #5 by Mark O’Brien (@mfophotos on IG)

Canival by Liz Potter (@lizpotterphotography on IG)

Technicolor Nightmare by Heartless Twyla (@heartlesstwyla on IG)

Order the ebook: https://ko-fi.com/s/d17d3a0f74

PATREON

Thank you to everyone who supports us!

Check out our Patreon for bonus episodes, extended interviews, early drops. Tons of stuff!

patreon.com/allthroughalens

THE CREDITS OF ENDING

Music by Last Regiment of Syncopated Drummers

Vania: IGFlickrZines
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits
Tiffen: IG

All Through a Lens: IGWebsitePatreonSpotify Playlists

U-Lead Systems, Inc.

Dev Party – The Future Draweth Nigh

Think of this Dev Party as the introduction to the Third Season of All Through a Lens. We discuss the future of our humble little podcast while developing photos we shot after returning from our respective breaks.

Vania (@surfmartian on IG) developed Velvia 100F in C-41 because “I do what I want.” It was a roll of 220 shot through her Pentax 645 in a waterhousing.

Here are a few:

Meanwhile, Eric (@conspiracy.of.cartographers on IG) developed two sheets of Foma Retropan 320 in Foma Retro Special (as the good lord intended). He shot them with Kate Miller-Wilson (@katemillerwilson in IG) through the Chamonix.

Here they are:

END CREDITS

www.allthroughalens.com

Vania: IGFlickrZines, Website
Eric: IGFlickrZinesECN-2 Kits